If your application for asylum is rejected

A rejection of your application means that the Swedish Migration Agency does not believe you have sufficient grounds to remain in Sweden. You can choose to accept or appeal against the decision.

If you accept the decision on refusal of entry or expulsion, you can sign a so-called declaration of acceptance. Once you have signed a declaration of acceptance, you cannot appeal against the decision and you must plan your return journey. Even if you sign a declaration of acceptance, it is important that you cooperate with the Swedish Migration Agency regarding your return.

Read more about returning voluntarily

Information for children without a custodian and who have had a rejection

The decision will tell you when you must leave Sweden

The decision tells you how much time you have to leave Sweden, often within four weeks from the date the decision acquires legal force. ‘The decision acquires legal force’ means it has become effective and can no longer be appealed. In most cases this happens three weeks after the Swedish Migration Agency has notified you of the decision, or when you have signed a declaration of acceptance. You must be aware yourself of when the decision acquires legal force, and leave the country within the time specified in the decision.

A decision on rejection is normally valid for four years.

Refusal of entry that is to be enforced immediately

If you have received a decision on refusal of entry that is to be enforced immediately, you must leave Sweden as soon as you have received the decision.

If you want to appeal

A decision by the Swedish Migration Agency can be appealed. If you choose to appeal, a court will consider the decision. The decision tells you how much time you have to appeal, often three weeks from the date the decision was notified. Even if you choose to lodge and appeal, you should make plans to return.

Read more about how to lodge an appeal

Planning your journey home

When you have received a decision on refusal of entry or expulsion, you are invited to an interview with an officer of the Swedish Migration Agency to plan for your return. You will be given information on what the options are in your case, and you may also ask questions.

If you are planning to leave Sweden of your own accord before you are invited to an interview on returning, you can visit your nearest reception unit for further information. There you can get, for example, an exit certificate, which you will need to hand in to a Swedish passport control when you leave the country.

Read more about returning voluntarily

Support with your return

Depending on what country you come from, you may be entitled to cash support or other forms of support to make it easier for you to settle in your country of origin again. A condition for entitlement to cash support is that you return voluntarily.

Read more about who can receive support with their return

If you do not comply with a decision

Once the decision has acquired legal force and can no longer be appealed, you must leave Sweden. When the deadline has expired, you will no longer be entitled to accommodation and financial support from the Swedish Migration Agency. This applies to adults who are not custodians of children under 18 years of age.

Anyone who is still entitled to financial support from the Swedish Migration Agency (families with children, for example) may receive a reduced daily allowance if he or she does not cooperate to leave the country.

If you do not cooperate in your return, the Swedish Migration Agency may make a decision on supervision or detention. Supervision means that you must regularly report to the Swedish Migration Agency or the Police. If you receive a decision on detention, you must stay in accommodation that is under lock and key while awaiting your departure.

Read more about supervision and detention

Re-entry ban

If you do not leave Sweden within the time period indicated in the decision, you may be issued with a re-entry ban, meaning that you cannot return to any of the Schengen countries, Romania, Bulgaria or Croatia. The re-entry ban is valid for one year.

If you have received a decision on refusal of entry that is to be enforced immediately, a re-entry ban will be imposed in all cases, normally for at least two years, even if you leave Sweden immediately.

Re-entry ban on other grounds

If the Swedish Migration Agency does not believe you will leave Sweden voluntarily, you may be issued with a re-entry ban for the Schengen area, which is valid for up to five years. This can happen, for example, if you

  • have previously stayed away
  • have said you do not intend to leave Sweden
  • have used a false identity or failed to help the Swedish Migration Agency to establish your identity
  • have knowingly given information that is not correct or have not provided important information
  • have been convicted of an offence that may lead to imprisonment.

If you are given a re-entry ban for any of these reasons, you will lose the time you had to travel home voluntarily and must leave the country immediately.

If you lose the time for returning home voluntarily, this means you also lose your right to accommodation and financial support from the Swedish Migration Agency, if you do not have children under the age of 18.

The Police can assume responsibility for your return

If it is not possible to enforce the decision on refusal of entry or expulsion on the grounds that you do not cooperate, the Swedish Migration Agency may leave the responsibility for ensuring you leave the country with the Police. If you keep away, the Police has the right to search for and investigate you. The Police also has the right to use force to ensure you leave the country.

If your case is referred to the Police, you no longer have the right to any form of cash support. Other support to help you to resettle in your country of origin will be reduced.

If the Police have assumed the responsibility for your refusal of entry or expulsion, you should contact them if you have any questions about your return journey.

New incidents after rejection

If anything happens which means you are unable to return, you must let the reception unit know. The Swedish Migration Agency will then consider whether there are any obstacles to implementing the expulsion. This should be new information that has appeared after you received the decision.

Read more about what to do if there are new incidents after rejection

The following countries are covered by the Schengen Agreement

Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

The re-entry ban also includes Romania, Bulgaria, and Croatia.

Last updated: 18 September 2019

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If you wish to ask the Migration Agency a question you can find our contact details under the heading Contact us.